IS THIS GUY COMPETENT - THINKING LONGER AND HARDER

(- Copyright © 2016 by Mike Stewart -)

If you work in the Financial Services Industry, you may be subject to some of the most extensive and detailed regulations imaginable. The Government and the Industry demand that you meet certain standards of conduct and knowledge. Anyone who practices without the required certifications may be subject to legal action, and even when not required, the public may view such people as charlatans.

Being a sales professional in your field without the required certifications is like being a major league baseball player taking the field without a glove.

If you have spent extensive time and money qualifying as a professional in the Financial Services Industry, you obviously want people in general and your prospects in particular, to know about all of your qualifications. And, you have a giant, multi-billion dollar industry that supports you in this effort.

This support includes multiple, continuous Ad Campaigns. For the Internet, which is relatively new, websites, emails, social networking, and other "modern" tactics are used to help you.

IN NO WAY AM I MINIMIZING THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS. But almost all of these are standardized and sterilized, the justification being to "protect the public".

The advent of the Internet has made possible dynamic, customized, revolutionary advertising campaigns that drive customers to individual sales professionals. Unfortunately, many ambitious agents have been convinced that industry policies and standards keep them from using their creativity to succeed.

It is useful to compare professions. Surprisingly, the problems and challenges of completely different professions can be amazingly similar. For example, you may be in a highly regulated industry as described above. I am in an almost completely unregulated industry. If someone asks you what you do, you may answer "I help people plan their retirement". I might respond to the same question "I help people rank high on search engines".

If either one of us is talking to a prospect, we have limited time to maintain his interest. Experts constantly talk about "Elevators Speeches". You probably know what an Elevator Speech is, but, if not, to save you time, I googled for a brief definition: "An elevator speech is a clear, brief message or “commercial” about you. It communicates who you are, what you're looking for and how you can benefit a company or organization. It's typically about 30 seconds, the time it takes people to ride from the top to the bottom of a building in an elevator.".

When you are "thinking longer and harder" about an elevator speech, your primary concern should not be what is in the speech - many experts and your common sense can tell you that. What you should be worried about is "Will It Work?". Do you have a high possibility of making the sale? If it doesn't work, can you improve it? If not, can you do something completely different in your 30 second elevator ride?

You may note that you have about 30 seconds to give your elevator speech. Is 30 seconds a long time or a short time?? YES It is.

Even before the Internet, Experts recognized that you only had about seven seconds to make a good first impression. You should think seriously about what you want to say initially - if it is too "standard", you will be tuned out and it won't matter what you say later.

The most important part of the elevator speech is how you can benefit a company or organization, or more specifically, the person you are talking with. The most effective way to make a good first impression and to maintain interest during your 30 second elevator ride is to ask about the other person, his problems, and what he does. He will do most of the talking and your 30 seconds will seem very short. The problem is you will have very little time to discuss why you are uniquely qualified to help him and to understand and address objections he will surely have.

On the other hand, you can try to dominate the conversation, but still come across as friendly and competent. You may try to get some quick, personal information on the fly and then weave it into an interesting seven second opening. You can then try to maintain interest in what you have to offer for the rest of the ride. If you are a natural salesman, you may be able to easily do this and 30 seconds will pass quickly. For most of us, the time will drag by, and yet, later, we will feel we didn't have nearly enough time to explain ourselves.

If you use the power of the modern technology, you can fundamentally change how an elevator speech is defined.

There is a hidden assumption that the purpose of the elevator speech is to get an appointment which may eventually lead to more meetings and finally a formal agreement.

Let's give a quick, simplified example of one of many possible ways you could use the Internet to redefine the purpose of the elevator speech (We help our clients with this kind of work, but we offer much, much more).

If you develop several websites, each similar (for example, each showing your certifications) and each dynamic, the cost is not that much more than a single website. You can then customize each to address the likely views, needs, and possible objections of different prospects you are likely to meet in an elevator or any situation where your time is limited. By carefully and extensively thinking about your prospects, each website can be developed to show why you are UNIQUELY QUALIFIED TO HELP. For each website, you will need corresponding business cards.

Now, in the elevator, you can encourage your prospect to talk as much as possible. He will appreciate it and you will gain valuable information. Before parting, give him the appropriate business card and encourage him to visit the site. There are techniques to improve the likelihood he will do as you ask. Finally, promise him a call back to discuss a meeting.

Reaching people at the right time is very powerful. That is why, before I realized the Internet can do much more than this, I used the slogan "Your Website is Worthless If No One Can Find It".

Return to INTRODUCTION TO THINKING LONGER AND HARDER. Or, if you liked this, send an email to Mike Stewart. - mike@esearchfor.com

IS THIS GUY COMPETENT - THINKING LONGER AND HARDER

 

 
 

(- Copyright © 2016 by Mike Stewart -)

If you work in the Financial Services Industry, you may be subject to some of the most extensive and detailed regulations imaginable. The Government and the Industry demand that you meet certain standards of conduct and knowledge. Anyone who practices without the required certifications may be subject to legal action, and even when not required, the public may view such people as charlatans.

Being a sales professional in your field without the required certifications is like being a major league baseball player taking the field without a glove.

If you have spent extensive time and money qualifying as a professional in the Financial Services Industry, you obviously want people in general and your prospects in particular, to know about all of your qualifications. And, you have a giant, multi-billion dollar industry that supports you in this effort.

This support includes multiple, continuous Ad Campaigns. For the Internet, which is relatively new, websites, emails, social networking, and other "modern" tactics are used to help you.

IN NO WAY AM I MINIMIZING THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS. But almost all of these are standardized and sterilized, the justification being to "protect the public".

The advent of the Internet has made possible dynamic, customized, revolutionary advertising campaigns that drive customers to individual sales professionals. Unfortunately, many ambitious agents have been convinced that industry policies and standards keep them from using their creativity to succeed.

It is useful to compare professions. Surprisingly, the problems and challenges of completely different professions can be amazingly similar. For example, you may be in a highly regulated industry as described above. I am in an almost completely unregulated industry. If someone asks you what you do, you may answer "I help people plan their retirement". I might respond to the same question "I help people rank high on search engines".

If either one of us is talking to a prospect, we have limited time to maintain his interest. Experts constantly talk about "Elevators Speeches". You probably know what an Elevator Speech is, but, if not, to save you time, I googled for a brief definition: "An elevator speech is a clear, brief message or “commercial” about you. It communicates who you are, what you're looking for and how you can benefit a company or organization. It's typically about 30 seconds, the time it takes people to ride from the top to the bottom of a building in an elevator.".

When you are "thinking longer and harder" about an elevator speech, your primary concern should not be what is in the speech - many experts and your common sense can tell you that. What you should be worried about is "Will It Work?". Do you have a high possibility of making the sale? If it doesn't work, can you improve it? If not, can you do something completely different in your 30 second elevator ride?

You may note that you have about 30 seconds to give your elevator speech. Is 30 seconds a long time or a short time?? YES It is.

Even before the Internet, Experts recognized that you only had about seven seconds to make a good first impression. You should think seriously about what you want to say initially - if it is too "standard", you will be tuned out and it won't matter what you say later.

The most important part of the elevator speech is how you can benefit a company or organization, or more specifically, the person you are talking with. The most effective way to make a good first impression and to maintain interest during your 30 second elevator ride is to ask about the other person, his problems, and what he does. He will do most of the talking and your 30 seconds will seem very short. The problem is you will have very little time to discuss why you are uniquely qualified to help him and to understand and address objections he will surely have.

On the other hand, you can try to dominate the conversation, but still come across as friendly and competent. You may try to get some quick, personal information on the fly and then weave it into an interesting seven second opening. You can then try to maintain interest in what you have to offer for the rest of the ride. If you are a natural salesman, you may be able to easily do this and 30 seconds will pass quickly. For most of us, the time will drag by, and yet, later, we will feel we didn't have nearly enough time to explain ourselves.

If you use the power of the modern technology, you can fundamentally change how an elevator speech is defined.

There is a hidden assumption that the purpose of the elevator speech is to get an appointment which may eventually lead to more meetings and finally a formal agreement.

Let's give a quick, simplified example of one of many possible ways you could use the Internet to redefine the purpose of the elevator speech (We help our clients with this kind of work, but we offer much, much more).

If you develop several websites, each similar (for example, each showing your certifications) and each dynamic, the cost is not that much more than a single website. You can then customize each to address the likely views, needs, and possible objections of different prospects you are likely to meet in an elevator or any situation where your time is limited. By carefully and extensively thinking about your prospects, each website can be developed to show why you are UNIQUELY QUALIFIED TO HELP. For each website, you will need corresponding business cards.

Now, in the elevator, you can encourage your prospect to talk as much as possible. He will appreciate it and you will gain valuable information. Before parting, give him the appropriate business card and encourage him to visit the site. There are techniques to improve the likelihood he will do as you ask. Finally, promise him a call back to discuss a meeting.

Reaching people at the right time is very powerful. That is why, before I realized the Internet can do much more than this, I used the slogan "Your Website is Worthless If No One Can Find It".

Return to INTRODUCTION TO THINKING LONGER AND HARDER. Or, if you liked this, send an email to Mike Stewart. - mike@esearchfor.com